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E2 Foodie Friday: A Plant-Based Calcium-Iron Treat

For pregnant and/or breastfeeding mothers concerned with their calcium and iron intake, an easy, tasty way to get a boost every day is with a surprisingly simple treat:

Hot water and one tablespoon blackstrap molasses with your fortified milk substitute of choice.  Delicious!

Also remember — the best sources of plant-based, absorbable calcium and iron are leafy greens and beans — and leafy greens contain Vitamin C which helps the body absorb iron.  Dairy products, on the other hand, may interfere with iron balance, especially in small children.

Other iron-rich foods include: raisins, almonds, dried apricots, and fortified grain cereals. Other calcium sources include tofu, dried figs, tahini, great northern beans, and fortified oranges juice and non-dairy milks. As with iron, vitamin C will help with calcium absorption.


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