Recipes

Engine 2 Hummus

This is the most basic of the spreads. You can find a variation of this recipe in almost any grocery store, but 95 percent of them are made with either olive oil or tahini (sesame paste), which pushes up the fat content. Your best bet is to take three minutes and make a batch on Sunday that will last you for the week.

  • Prep Time 10 minutes
  • Total Time 10 minutes
  • Serves 1-5

Healthy Homemade Hummus

Ingredients:

2 cans chick peas, rinsed and drained

3 cloves garlic

Juice of 1 lemon

2 teaspoons ground cumin

2 teaspoons Bragg Liquid Aminos

1/4 cup water or vegetable broth

 

Instructions:

Blend all ingredients into a thick paste.

 

Variations:

Customize by adding one or more of the following:

2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds

1 fresh jalapeno, seeded and chopped

1 roasted and chopped red bell pepper

1 cup dark or Kalamata olives

1 bunch fresh mint

1 cup fresh spinach

1 cup cooked eggplant

30 Comments
  • Elba
    Posted at 16:02h, 23 September

    What are Bragg Liquid Aminos?

    • Kay
      Posted at 18:19h, 24 September

      It’s like soy sauce or tamari sauce.

    • Amanda
      Posted at 13:50h, 07 January

      Liquid aminos taste so good in anything. My “omni” son loves the aminos and would drink the stuff if I let him.
      I believe they are amino acids that are present in your body and that your body needs.

    • Katie
      Posted at 23:26h, 28 June

      It’s like a tamer soy sauce with kind of a buttery taste (I feel). SOOOOOOOO good!! Nutritional yeast is golden too! Lots of flavor and B vitamins! Gonna go make some popcorn with that on it now…..haha

  • Queade Di Ilio
    Posted at 07:21h, 18 November

    Why the Bragg Liquid Aminos? I thought a whole food plant based diet gave you a well balanced protein source?

    • Jan
      Posted at 09:17h, 24 November

      It’s not for the protein but for the taste as it adds a deeper, salty taste to the hummus 🙂

  • Lizzle
    Posted at 07:06h, 21 December

    I thought to much soy in your diet was a bad thing? I was adviced to only eat soy twice a month. But i see that soy is used frequently in the engine 2 diet. What are your thoughts on soy? I see you use Bragg liquid amino’s.

    • Arrow Bast
      Posted at 21:40h, 14 September

      Soy sauce is a seasoning , very little volume in a dish and fully fermented and , its different from eating tons of Soybeans or tofu or drinking soymilk, unless its tainted with added MSG is probably okay in the average persons serving size , unless you have a serious soy allergy

  • pj
    Posted at 06:54h, 11 January

    I checked.. and found one that does not contain soy. from Prevent & Reverse Heart Disease Cookbook by Ann & Jane Esselstyn. They use spicy brown mustard with the option of 1/4 tsp of salt (optional, we do not use it). The recipes I have seen give U the option but they always add the () as a sort of disclaimer..

  • reikipcw
    Posted at 11:41h, 31 January

    If you don’t want soy, you can use coconut aminos. You can also substitute any other rich, flavorful liquid.

    • Theresa Excell
      Posted at 19:42h, 10 February

      braggs liquid aminos is not a soy product

      • Guest
        Posted at 09:57h, 20 February

        From the Bragg’s website:
        Ingredients: Our Bragg Liquid Aminos are made from health-giving, NON-GMO soybeans and purified water. They are an excellent, healthy, gourmet replacement for Tamari and Soy Sauce. Not fermented or heated and Gluten-Free.

  • Katie
    Posted at 18:28h, 30 March

    Garlic is NOT my friend…what is an alternative to garlic in recipes?

    • brentwood md
      Posted at 15:51h, 18 April

      onions?

    • Kitt
      Posted at 22:15h, 27 May

      shalots? Pearl Onions? Possibly consider leaving it out? Garlic powder too?

    • Katie
      Posted at 23:24h, 28 June

      Anything with a similarly strong taste that you enjoy. I have a friend who hates garlic as well, and, while it can’t be substituted exactly, she likes flavors like cumin in place of garlic in her hummus, for example.

    • Kimberly Robb Baker
      Posted at 16:32h, 02 November

      Use hing. It’s a powdered root and you can get it in Asian markets. It adds the nuance of garlic. It stinks and is potent, but in a small amount is a great garlic substitute.

  • Chris
    Posted at 23:11h, 09 April

    I don’t get it. Olive oil and sesame paste are both plant products, so what’s the issue? If fat is the issue, why not exile peanut butter as well?

    • Arrow
      Posted at 01:49h, 24 May

      Peanuts are Bad, I agree they should be taken off the approved list ASAP! All tree nuts should be consumed only in small amounts (TOTAL less that 2 Tablespoons per person per day) , and only pine nuts, pistachio, walnuts and small amounts of cashew or brazil nuts are recommended. Only Organic Wheat/Barley/Rye is approved, and only if you do not have gluten or celiac issues .

      • Arrow
        Posted at 01:54h, 24 May

        Olive oil is a refined food, as it only contains fats. Whole Olives have other nutritional factors and some fiber , there’s a sea of difference in the way they are assimilated by the body . I usually grate black olives onto my food as a garnish, and not more than 2 black olives per meal . Olive oil (direct) as it is increases oleic acid absorption in the body and triggers some amount of Endothelial dysfunction. Oils are the refined fat equivalent of refined carbohydrates like ‘Enriched’ Flour or HFCS

        • Market Monkey
          Posted at 10:36h, 26 November

          “Oils are the refined fat equivalent of refined carbohydrates like ‘Enriched’ Flour or HFCS”….

          …. or freshly squeezed orange juice ;).

    • Katie
      Posted at 23:22h, 28 June

      They’re not the devil, but if you don’t like them, don’t use them… I think that people get thrown off with people recommending to not use them. I feel you should eat what makes you feel the best for YOU. As with nuts, any oil is to be used sparingly and you will not be sent to “plant-based hell” for using it (haha). As long as the majority (probably 90-95%) of your nutrition is from fruits/veg/legumes and you feel well, there’s no problem. If olive oil or peanuts is all that’s standing between someone and a full plant-based diet, they’re doing’ pretty darn well! xo

      • Graham
        Posted at 01:44h, 26 July

        What about Dr. Essylstyn’s “No oil” mantra? Isn’t his approach the star his son is hitched to?

        • Michael Westhafer
          Posted at 19:30h, 26 October

          Refined oils (including olive oil) is processed and based on Dr Essyltyn’s research, is bad. Whole nuts can add healthy fat in place of oils, as can avacodo.

          • sarah
            Posted at 13:58h, 27 December

            In Dr. Esselstyn’s book, Prevent and Reverse Heart Disese, on page 121 under The Rules section, items 9 clearly states: “Do not eat any nuts (although if you do not have heart disease, you can occassionally have walnuts”) and item 10 states “Do not eat any avocados.” I am questioning whether you actually read Dr. Esselstyn’s book. I, however agree with you that avocados and nuts – in small quantities- make the bland recipes in the Esselstyn book bearable. Most of the recipes are thrown together and if followed to the letter (as I did) made me angry because they turned me off the plant based diet and I nearly quit. I look elsewhere for recipes and guidelines from other authors in order to stay on track.

  • brentwood md
    Posted at 16:44h, 18 April

    can you freeze this stuff?

  • Arrow
    Posted at 01:44h, 24 May

    Shouldn’t Peanut Products be Banned in Engine 2 ? Peanut Lectins cause structural damage to vasculature, Id also recommend eating quarter to half a raw red onion prior to meals with some vitamin C for better heart health

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